The Best Investment Designer Handbags to Buy, from Chanel to Dior

The designer handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items. that bring in the most cash when re-sold have been revealed by a firm specialising in vintage and pre-loved fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers..

Chanel, Louis Vuitton, and Dior are among the brandsA brand (or marque for car model) is a name, term, design, symbol or other feature that distinguishes one seller’s product from those of others.Brands are used in business, marketing, and advertising. Initially, livestock branding was adopted to differentiate one person’s cattle from another’s by means of a distinctive symbol burned into the animal’s skin with a hot branding iron. which appear on a list highlighting the bags that make the best returns compiled by luxury fashion website Vestaire Collective, according to Mail Online.

The classic Chanel flap handbag, characterised by its ‘CC’ logo and quilting, costs £3,840 when bought new. But the rarest styles, for example those made with crocodile skin, can be re-sold for up to £33,000.

The list follows a recent study which found that it can make more economic sense to invest in a Chanel 2.55 handbag than in the stock market. The JustCollecting Rare Handbag Index, which tracks investment-level bags, found that in the 12 years from 2004 to 2016, the Chanel 2.55 Medium Classic Flag bag had spiked by 230 per cent in value, the Financial Times reported.

Scroll down below to find out which bags made the Vestaire Collective list.

Chanel 2.55
The 2.55, whose chains are inspired by the caretaker’s keys at the orphanage where Coco Chanel spent her childhood, costs £3,900 new. But it can be sold off for £6,000.

Chanel Boy
The Chanel Boy, with its adjustable strap, will set back a buyer £3,300 if new. But the right bag can make a seller as much a £2,300 at £5,600.

Louis Vuitton Speedy
The Louis Vuitton Speedy, with its iconic monogram print, was the first bag that the brand created. A new bag costs £696, but can fetch up to £2,500 if it sold on.

Louis Vuitton Neverfull
The Neverfull comes in all shapes and sizes and has seen collaborations with a long line of top artists including Yayoi Kusama and Stephen Sprouse. Bought new, a Neverfull can cost £880. But the most sought after can be sold on for up to £2,500.

Dior Lady
This bag has been linked with the late Princess Diana since the then-First Lady of France Madame Bernadette Chirac, gifted it to the monarch in 1995 – a year after its creation. A new Lady costs £3,900. But the rarest and best kept bags can be sold for as much as £18,000.

Celine Trapeze
The Trapeze is one of the world’s most recognisable bags, thanks to its box flap and wings. New, it costs £1,750 and can make an owner £1,500 if it’s sold on.

Hermes Kelly
Hermes bags are among the most coveted in the world – and the Kelly is no exception. Named after the actress and princess of Monaco Grace Kelly, a new bag can cost £6,000 but can fetch up to £42,000 when sold again.

Valentino Rockstud
The Rockstud bag, which showcases a tough-luxe aesthetic, costs £1520. However, if a seller is lucky it can bring in a return of £580.

Givenchy Antigona
Launched in 2010, the Antigona is characterised by its double-rolled handles and exposed stitching. A new bag will set a buyer back £1,590, but can be re-sold for as much as £16,000.

source:http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/best-investment-designer-handbags-buy-sell-chanel-dior-louis-vuitton-hermes-givenchy-valentino-a7711461.html

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2018 READY-TO-WEAR–Christian Dior

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the youth revolts of 1968, Maria Grazia Chiuri pointed out in a preview on Monday. “What I think is unbelievable is that the questions are the same. The way we talk about them has changed, but the arguments are the same,” she reflected with impassionate gesticulation, her copious bangles clanking away. “What’s important now for the young generation is gender, race and the environment.” Drawing a parallel between then and now, she dedicated her Christian Dior collection to the changes in the everyday women’s wardrobe triggered by 1968: trousersTrousers (pants in North America and Australia) are an item of clothing worn from the waist to the ankles, covering both legs separately (rather than with cloth extending across both legs as in robes, skirts, and dresses). In the UK the word “pants” generally means underwear and not trousers.Shorts are similar to trousers, but with legs that come down only to around the area of the knee, higher or lower depending on the style of the garment. To distinguish them from shorts, trousers may be called “long trousers” in certain contexts such as school uniform, where tailored shorts may be called “short trousers”, especially in the UK., blazerA blazer is a type of jacket resembling a suit jacket, but cut more casually. A blazer is generally distinguished from a sportcoat as a more formal garment and tailored from solid color fabrics. Blazers often have naval-style metal buttons to reflect their origins as jackets worn by boating club members., flats and denimDenim is a sturdy cotton warp-faced twill textile in which the weft passes under two or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces the familiar diagonal ribbing of the denim that distinguishes it from cotton duck (a linen canvas).. “Sixty-eight really started unisex,” she noted. It was the year after Marc Bohan had opened Miss Dior, a ready-to-wear store on 11 rue Fran?ois 1er, which broke with the idea of shopping via bespoke atelier fittings only. “Couture was a little bit passé.” A New York Times article from 1967, pinned to Chiuri’s mood board, reported that “missing at Miss Dior are long, elaborate dresses to wear at the opera or at big balls.”

Bohan was responding to the times. In 1966, a group of short-hemmed women protested the house’s lack of skimpy skirts outside the Dior store in London holding banners with the slogans “Dior, Don’t Betray the Mini Skirt” and “Mini Skirts Forever.” Needless to say, there were plenty of them in Chiuri’s collection, albeit more historically correct than mini by today’s standards. Embracing the protest spirit, a knit spelled out the designer’s newest slogan. Gone were the literal T-shirts of past collections with statements like “We should all be feminists”, in their place simply the words, “Non, non, non.” Chiuri likened the sentiment of refusal to today’s millennial spirit, using her 21-year-old daughter Rachele Regini – who studies History of Art at Goldsmiths in London – as an example of the woke mindset: “I call Rachele the No-Girl. Whenever I ask her something she says, ‘No!’ And I think sometimes it’s good to say no, because it’s difficult. It’s not easy. I wanted to start this collection by saying, ‘No, no, no!’”

She never mentioned #MeToo or Time’s Up, but the connection was evident. (Her usual stylist Karl Templer, who has strongly denied allegations of misconduct published in an article in the Boston Globe last week, did not style the show.) Chiuri had also become fascinated with the word “youthquake”. Named Word of the Year by the Oxford Dictionary in 2017, it was first coined by American Vogue’s Diana Vreeland in 1965: “The year’s in its youth, the youth in its year,” she wrote. “More dreamers. More doers. Here. Now. Youthquake 1965.” Halfway through the revolutionising decade, Vreeland was spot on. “She said, ‘In the twenties and sixties everything changed.’ She started talking about these modern women,” Chiuri recounted, hinting at the present-day women’s and youth movements as the third installment in that evolution. What happened, then, between the 1960s and now that we’re still fighting the same battles? “Probably because in the middle, we forgot what’s really important to us?” Chiuri offered.

“The relationship between fashion and change was very important. Now, in a different way – with the web – it’s the same. Fashion has a huge influence on the young generation so we have a huge responsibility in what we do.” While the direction she’s taken at Dior has been observed more for its appeal to an audience older than the youth-centric fashion that fills the industry, the social messages Chiuri has imbued her collection’s with have captured the neo-feminist zeitgeist to perfection. It was a balance summed up in the practical, functional and relatable character of this collection, too. A patchwork dress and skirt intricately made from fabrics used by Dior through the decades served as a reminder of the revolutions battled out in the 1960s, but also the artisanal value key to Chiuri’s work. “I think it’s nice to think about mixing things in all sorts of different ways, and also to speak about the human touch. Because in some ways, what we are all looking for is to feel the human touch,” she said.

source:http://www.vogue.co.uk/shows/autumn-winter-2018-ready-to-wear/christian-dior

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The Story Behind Dior’s AW18 Slogan-Heavy Set

Dior sets are always a spectacle, but for autumn/winter 2018, Maria Grazia Chiuri is returning to the Musée Rodin with a statement: the set for the latest collection comprises an eye-catching collage of 3,000 posters.

Conceived by set designer and frequent DiorChristian Dior SE (French pronunciation: ​[kʁis.tjɑ̃ djɔːʁ]), commonly known as Dior, is a European luxury goods company controlled and chaired by French businessman Bernard Arnault, who also heads LVMH – the world’s largest luxury group. collaborator Alexandre de Betak, the backdrop takes its cue from the autumn collection, the unveiling of which coincides with the 50th anniversary of the protests that shook Paris in May 1968. The series of strikes proved to be a turning point in France, igniting a deeper conversation about society and its values.

It took 150 people three weeks to build the set: covering the double runway – seats, walls and all – with posters inspired by that urgent anti-authoritarian spirit of 1968. An expansive mirrored ceiling reflects the cacophony of visuals beneath: fragments of feminist slogans, vintage magazine covers – British and American Vogue included – and archival protest images, patched together as a collage of insurgence, reinvention and strength. Through the commotion, one poster stands out, black writing on a white backdrop at the end of the runway: “I AM A WOMAN.”

All of which serves to ignite a guessing game: what will the clothes look like? Our money’s on more berets, mini skirtsA skirt is a tube- or cone-shaped garment that hangs from the waist or hips and covers all or part of the legs. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer’s personal taste, which can be influenced by such factors as fashion and social context. and a load of slogan T-shirtsA T-shirt (or t shirt, or tee) is a style of unisex fabric shirt named after the T shape of its body and sleeves. It normally has short sleeves and a round neckline, known as a crew neck, which lacks a collar. T-shirts are generally made of a light, inexpensive fabric and are easy to clean.

source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/gallery/story-behind-diors-aw18-slogan-heavy-set

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Cara Wore Dior’s New It-Accessory Before It Even Hit The Catwalk

When Maria Grazia Chiuri took the helm at Dior, she reintroduced the beret as an accessoryA fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearer’s outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearer’s look. to covet. Now, four seasons on, the designer has updated her headwear. You might have been wearing one for sometime, it’s not always the catwalks that leads the way, you know? Enter the Dior bakerboy.

Sitting front row, Cara Delevingne had hers pulled neatly over her pixie crop and teamed with a top-to-toe tailored look by the house. Clearly not feeling the Beast from the East, Cara went without a traditional shirtA shirt is a cloth garment for the upper body (from the neck to the waist).Originally an undergarment worn exclusively by men, it has become, in American English, a catch-all term for a broad variety of upper-body garments and undergarments. In British English, a shirt is more specifically a garment with a collar, sleeves with cuffs, and a full vertical opening with buttons or snaps (North Americans would call that a “dress shirt”, a specific type of “collared shirt”). A shirt can also be worn with a necktie under the shirt collar. and instead opted for a logoed itsy-bitsy bralet.

Swapping the catwalk for the front row this time round, the model-turned-actress proved that her Brit charm can easily transcend into Parisian chic.

Cara being Cara, she of course injected a hefty dose of fun to the occasion while also proving she’s one of Dior’s biggest fans. The 25-year-old might have access to as many Dior pieces as a girl could need but nothing proves as novel as sitting in a shopping bag for an Insta snap.

Her full-look Dior and BTS banter aren’t the only things we’re talking about when it comes to Cara’s Dior appearance. Her left ear has us turning heads, too. Long a fan of tattoos and dainty piercings, did the Vogue cover girl take it one step further by having some body modifications? We spotted a new addition that wasn’t evident when she took to the Burberry catwalk at London fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers.

  • Week. You saw it here first.

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/cara-delevingne-dior-outfit-2018

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    #SuzyPFW: Dior goes back to the student riots of 1968

    C’est Non, Non, Non et Non! announced the sweater that opened the DiorChristian Dior SE, commonly known as Dior, is a European luxury goods company controlled and chaired by French businessman Bernard Arnault, who also heads LVMH – the world’s largest luxury group. show, while the walls outside and in the temporary space were covered with semi-graffiti: magazines, all from the same year, torn, or scribbled with messages.

    “Unfair to the mini skirt!” was a daub painted beside the picture of a Dior storesA retail store where merchandise is sold, usually a product, usually on a retail basis, and where wares are often kept..

    Maria Grazia Chiuri’s show was all about 1968, the year of the “Youthquake”, as the fashion editor Diana Vreeland named it, following rioting students in Paris and an explosion of unrest throughout Europe.

    “The young generation changed the world, so the references we are using at the back and all around the show were an important moment in fashion,” said Maria Grazia. “Couture houses either adapted or closed. It was the beginning of prêt-a-porter and the time of Miss Dior.”

    But for Maria Grazia, who has dedicated previous shows to the strength of women and made that her cause, the revolution 50 years ago was not just about sowing the seeds of student power, female power, black power and gay power. It was a period when there was a new belief in handicraft – and that was at the heart of the Dior Autumn/Winter 2018 show.

    “I’m trying to speak about feminine craftsmanship, and other works like knitwear and embroidery,” she said. “Patchwork is like another kind of print. I had 60 days to research the authenticity of lace, embroidery and patchwork, paint, craftsmanship, even fake fur made from wool.”

    The designer’s enthusiasm was infectious – on and off the runway. As the models walked out in their tailored jackets and kilt skirts, it became clear as they moved that the bottom halves were in the lightest of chiffon; while a sweater with a “ban the bomb” sign was teamed with a skirt of heavier wool. This hard/soft idea worked well and was an introduction to craftsmanship that was sharp and tough – not the hazy, hippie-de-luxe look that flowered in Woodstock in 1969.

    The show became a balance between masculine uniforms, typical of the arrival of the trouser suit in the 1960s, and decorative craftsmanship.

    ”I don’t know that it is hippie,” said the designer. “We speak about freedom, about rebellion, and there are many references. The checks come from Mr Dior’s years; we made chemises that came from Marc Bohan [a later Dior designer, from 1960 to 1989]. There is even a “unisex” outfit. You can mix them together. I think luxury brands should be timeless. Some things come from the past and some from the present.”

    With a section halfway through featuring bold, tailored coats and jackets to contrast with the colourful patchworks and embroideries, this was the most convincing show Maria Grazia has done in the female empowerment category. For Pietro Beccari, Dior’s new CEO, so many easy and appealing (dare we say “ordinary”?) clothes must have been a godsend.

    There is one caveat: it was Yves Saint Laurent which became the rebellious brandA brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer., raising the ire of straight-laced women, while Dior, once a shocker with its New Look skirts, was by 1968 a stable, sober house. Its clients were probably concerned about the 1968 riots rather than likely to join in.

    But today, with the demand for power for women, particularly in the aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein affair and the #MeToo campaign, Maria Grazia, with her grown-up daughter at her side, made a good shot with this collection for modern women.

    I just hope the forthright designer didn’t see eager members of the audience after the show climb the battleground of torn magazines, power women and demonstration slogans – as they posed for selfies.

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/suzypfw-dior-goes-back-to-the-student-riots-of-1968

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    #SuzyCouture: Dior’s Labyrinth Of Loveliness

    We decided to choose a garden, because when you are doing something elaborate you don’t know if you can find yourself – or if you’ve lost your way,” said Maria Grazia Chiuri to explain the labyrinth that made up the Christian Dior walkway. It included hedges of greenery and a hefty tree fluttering with decoration on bark and twigs.

    In her first Dior show for haute couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques., Maria Grazia – formerly half of the design duo in charge at Valentino – made a pure, beautiful feminine statement. It was an intriguing new edge to her ready-to-wear debut in which Maria Grazia sported a t-shirtA T-shirt (or t shirt, or tee) is a style of unisex fabric shirt named after the T shape of its body and sleeves. It normally has short sleeves and a round neckline, known as a crew neck, which lacks a collar. T-shirts are generally made of a light, inexpensive fabric and are easy to clean. emblazoned with ‘We should all be feminists’. Worn by the designer and by Natalie Portman in last week’s anti-Trump rally, it was even displayed at the show by Hélène Mercier Arnault, the musician wife of Bernard Arnault, owner of Dior.

    Strife and upheaval was left behind in this purposeful but gentle Dior collection, where the designer explained that lightness is everything: whether it was a tailored jacketsA jacket is a mid stomach length garment for the upper body. A jacket typically has sleeves, and fastens in the front or slightly on the side. A jacket is generally lighter, tighter-fitting, and less insulating than a coat, which is outerwear. Some jackets are fashionable, while others serve as protective clothing. with the famous 1950s ‘Bar’ shape made in pleated organza or a hymn to hand work in an embroidered dress that ended with a hem in wisps of raffia.

    The collection was topped by a charming and feather-light series of headdresses and masks from milliner Stephen Jones, preparing the audience for the ‘Dior Ball’ being held to celebrate at the end of the evening.

    “I have been waiting for a long time for this,” said Sidney Toledano, Dior’s CEO, who has handled a troop of designers from John Galliano’s ultra-feminine extravagance to Raf Simons’s modernist approach.

    Maybe it needed a woman – and one experienced in both couture and ready-to-wear – to understand the needs and yearnings of her fellow females. The all-black opening was discreet, not so much practical as elegantly wearable and with the same pleated effects in light fabrics covering most of the legs and body. No break-the-glass-ceiling statement here – but also no sexiness or vulgarity to serve as a stand-off to the alpha male.

    The pursuit of prettiness is always difficult in a modern scenario. But Maria Grazia’s effects were subtle in their femininity. Or as she put it: “We tried to keep Dior’s tone of no precise colours, none that you can define, all dusty in some way.”

    “After women, flowers are the most divine of creations – they are so delicate and charming – but they must be used carefully,” said the couturier, who died in 1957.

    The Dior statement does not sound like 21st-century feminism. But Maria Grazia’s collection proved that she could bring out the best in feminine fashion.

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/suzycouture-diors-labyrinth-of-loveliness

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    #SuzyCouture: Dior’s Arts & Masks

    Masked faces bobbed through the crowd, some smothered with a velvetVelvet can be made from either synthetic or natural fibers. Velvet is woven on a special loom that weaves. softness, others decorated with mighty plumes that shivered and shook while their owners swayed to the music.

    Just for a moment, it was possible to imagine that this was the crowd around the young Christian Dior, who hung out in the 1930s with arty friends, especially the Surrealists. And there was, indeed, nothing more surreal than seeing today’s luxury boss, Bernard Arnault, President and CEO of LVMH, partying with other executives, all masked, while mini chocolate cakes shaped as dominoes were served up by staff with clouds painted on their shirts. Meanwhile, houses of cards hung perilously off skeleton trees and were printed on skirts that flapped saucily as women danced on tables.

    Dior’s Artistic Director, Maria Grazia Chiuri, spelled it out in black and white. She found inspiration from those early years at the house, as seen in the recent massive retrospective study of the Christian Dior heritage at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris.

    “When I saw the exhibition, one of the first rooms was his art gallery and I found out that he was very close to Dali and other artists like Giacometti,” the designer said. “Dior held an exhibition by a woman called Leonor Fini, who claimed, ‘only the inevitable theatricality of my life interests me’. Having her in his gallery at that time – the idea was completely new. I am fascinated by this part of French culture, when people treated going to a ball like a performance. In some ways it is like people taking pictures with a selfie today – they want to give others an idea by giving part of themselves.”

    Before it was given over to the partyA party is a gathering of people who have been invited by a host for the purposes of socializing, conversation, recreation, or as part of a festival or other commemoration of a special occasion. A party will typically feature food and beverages, and often music and dancing or other forms of entertainment. In many Western countries, parties for teens and adults are associated with drinking alcohol such as beer, wine or distilled spirits., the giant tent in the gardens of the Musée Rodin was set up like an Alice in Wonderland world, with a black and white chessboard floor and Surrealist chessboard patterns on dresses. These three-dimensional effects could only have been created by haute couture, where the hand-workers had joined small pieces of fabric together with a minuscule running stitch.

    It made for a stunning start to the Dior collection, as masked modelsModel (people), a person in a role to promote, display, or advertise commercial products or to serve as a visual aide for people who are creating works of art., walking on the eye-popping black and white tiles, brought the dot and square effects to life. Add cages around the upper body, inspired by a pannier dress that Maria Grazia found in the Dior archives, and the suggestion was, according to the designer, Freudian dreams from the subconscious.

    But Maria Grazia promised that her treatment of the pannier made it more palatable for Millennials. “There is a big difference between Italian and French couture,” she said. “Italian couture is linked to the sartorial side, (meaning wearable) while French couture is more theatrical. I want a mix of the two.

    Yet there is nothing so new in either the re-positioning of Christian Dior’s vision from so long ago, nor in the clothes that Maria Grazia is offering. There might have been many more daytime outfits and much less focus on transparency, especially those cage tops. But it resulted in a striking show and a dramatic masked ball, both making a strong statement in black and white.

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/suzycouture-diors-arts-and-masks

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    #SuzyCouture: Dior’s Future, In Black And White

    FRIDAY IS D-DAY FOR DIOR, when the Paris couture house will announce its new designer, according to a high-up executive in the LVMH group.

    The choice is expected to be Maria Grazia Chiuri, part of the duo which has breathed new life into Valentino. That Italian company shows its couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. collection in Paris on Wednesday.

    The need for a strong, fresh design spirit was evident at the Paris show, held in the company’s historic home on the Avenue Montaigne. The Swiss design duo Lucie Meier and Serge Ruffieux spelled out in black and white – the only two colours they used – why neat and tidy fashion is not enough in these days of superbrands.

    Even Dior’s people seemed to think the show needed a little hotting up, as they invited Céline Dion, who sat next to Bernard Arnault, Chairman and CEO of LVMH, and veteran French rock star Johnny Hallyday.

    There was nothing wrong with the show – and much that was right – if couture were only about elegant clothes. Today, couture is also the scaffolding on which the vast edifice of a big fashion company must be refurbished, each season.

    Meier and Ruffieux built this collection on the foundation of the shapely ‘Bar’ suit; the duo called it the ‘beating heart’ that ‘punctuated the entire collection’. That famous silhouette was then reinforced by the use of black and white – and only those two ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ colours.

    This Autumn/Winter show was pleasing, often breaking into two the pieces that made up a hip-length black top, perhaps curved up at the back and worn over a full skirt or, occasionally, soft trousers.

    The success of the show was its sense of movement, so that a top would swing and a skirtsA skirt is a tube- or cone-shaped garment that hangs from the waist or hips and covers all or part of the legs. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer’s personal taste, which can be influenced by such factors as fashion and social context. flare. For once, the word ‘wearable’ never seemed ‘yawn!’ but rather a reality check on what clients would want to wear.

    To the simple, start-off styles there were some gilded accessories and an occasional snaking Paisley pattern in black and white. Embellishment became more intense – although still in a single golden colour – as the show moved forward. The workmanship was was fine, but still created three-dimensional floral effects. Whatever way, the collection was an homage to les petites mains or ‘tiny hands’, as the workers are known.

    I thought this winter couture collection might have had a bigger focus on outerwear and tailored coats, although there were a couple of charming fur shoulder pieces.

    The show will surely have success with clients who will find Dior fashion with a light touch. But for now, at this important house, there is currently an uncomfortable sense of: “Next!”

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/suzycouture-dior

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    This Instagram Account Combines Your Harry Potter And Dior Dreams-Dior

    Every now and again up pops an Instagram account to obsess over. Who can forget Hipster Barbie and her snap-happy attitude in 2015?

    The latest one to follow now marries our two favourites: the magical world of Harry Potter and the haute fashion fabulousness of Christian Dior.

    Having only launched at the beginning of January, this account is about to make it big. Follow for serious style inspiration that reimagines memorable scenes with new clothingClothing (also known as clothes and attire) is a collective term for garments, items worn on the body. Clothing can be made of textiles, animal skin, or other thin sheets of materials put together. stitched with a Dior label.

    Think Professor McGonagall in a mashup of couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. and ready-to-wear looks, Dumbledore styling out his robes with a now-house signature leather beret and then Hermione Granger in a spring/summer 2018 knitted cardigan that brings a new approach to Emma Watson’s character’s love of knitwearKnitted fabric is a textile that results from knitting. Its properties are distinct from woven fabric in that it is more flexible and can be more readily constructed into smaller pieces, making it ideal for socks and hats..

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/harry-potter-gryffindor-dior-instagram-account

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    LVMH Reshuffles Executive Roles–Dior

    DESIGNER musical chairs is a game the fashion industry is all too familiar with. Now it seems the executives are at it, too: it’s all change at LVMH, where it was announced today a number of senior figures will undergo a significant reshuffle.

    As of January 2018, Pierre-Yves Roussel, chairman and chief executive of the LVMH Fashion Group, will take up a new role of special advisor to the LVMH chairman and CEO, Bernard Arnault. Sidney Toledano, who has enjoyed a 20-year tenure at Dior, and is currently Dior chief executive and president, will now lead the LVMH Fashion Group, overseeing a brandA brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer. portfolio that includes Céline and Kenzo. Completing the switch-up, Fendi’s Pietro Baccari will step into Toledano’s shoes at Dior.

    The shift marks the end of an era at Dior where Toledano, a hands-on retailRetail is the process of selling consumer goods and/or services to customers through multiple channels of distribution to earn a profit. Demand is created through diverse target markets and promotional tactics, satisfying consumers’ wants and needs through a lean supply chain. In the 2000s, an increasing amount of retailing is done online using electronic payment and delivery via a courier or postal mail. Retailing includes subordinated services, such as delivery. expert who joined in 1994 and became president and chief executive in 1998, has been instrumental in overseeing an extraordinary period of expansion, including the opening of over 200 stores and a doubling of revenue over the past five years alone. He is seen as a luxury retail veteran who, earlier this year, supervised the project known internally as “One Dior”, the deal that saw LVMH buy Christian Dior Couture for €6.5 billion, consolidating the brand’s fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. and accessories business under the same umbrella as the LVMH-owned Parfums Christian Dior.

    As for Beccari, he takes over Dior at a time when it is more vital than ever to the success of LVMH. He looks primed to succeed: having joined Fendi in 2012, he has a strong track record and has transformed the Italian brand from a fur specialist into one of the fastest-growing brands in the LVMH portfolio. His focus has been the expansion of its ready-to-wear, launching special luxe editions of the classic Fendi Baguette while dialling down the logo-heavy bags, and focussing on pop-up stores and headline-grabbing events. Beccari has also invested in a bigger creative team as well as a digital director for social media and e-commerce, and has spoken in the past of the importance of investing in dedicated, creative employees.

    Questions still remain over Bernard Arnault’s personal succession plans. Three of his five children have senior positions within the LVMH group. His eldest daughter Delphine, 42, earned her stripes at Dior and is the director and executive vice president at Louis Vuitton, while his son Antoine, 40, is the CEO of Berluti and chairman of Loro Piana. Meanwhile his third child, Alexandre, 25, has emerged as a digital whizz kid, and was named co-chief executive of Rimowa after LVMH acquired an 80 per cent stake in the luxury luggage brand in 2016. Sources close to the 68-year-old Arnault, however, suggest he has no intention of retiring soon. One thing is certain: if work ethic is hereditary, LVMH is in safe hands.

    source: http://www.vogue.co.uk/article/lvmh-reshuffles-executive-roles

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