Behind the Scenes at the Fall 2018 Givenchy Show in Paris With Karen Elson

Musician, modelModel (people), a person in a role to promote, display, or advertise commercial products or to serve as a visual aide for people who are creating works of art., and arbiter of all things cool Karen Elson was like a kid in a candy storeA retail store where merchandise is sold, usually a product, usually on a retail basis, and where wares are often kept. at the Givenchy studio over the weekend. She excitedly sifted through a rack of faux fur and cozy knits, admiring Clare Waight Keller’s fine handiwork for the storied French house. Elson was there to choose something to wear to watch Waight Keller’s second outing for Givenchy, and ultimately she landed on a pleated color-blocked skirtA skirt is a tube- or cone-shaped garment that hangs from the waist or hips and covers all or part of the legs. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer’s personal taste, which can be influenced by such factors as fashion and social context. and pussy-bow blouse that she described as “so Annie Hall.” Elson, in her best power woman–cum–Diane Keaton look, took in the collection, inspired by the film B Movie: Lust & Sound in West Berlin, 1979–1989, from the front row. Afterward, she changed into a low-cut black lace top and skinny trousers to perform at the silver fringe–laced after-party. From a kid in a candy store to a songstress onstage dressed in head-to-toe Givenchy, Elson’s day in Paris was the stuff of fashion dreams. Here, she takes us behind the scenes of every single magical moment.

source: https://www.vogue.com/article/givenchy-fall-2018-karen-elson

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Polka-Dots: The Timeless Trend Gets a Modern Update for Spring-Givenchy

A typically juvenile trend, chances are you were dressed in polka-dots as a child. And while there can be something wistfully nostalgic about wearing them now; there’s a fine line between a trend that’s playful and one that’s infantile.

So, how do you wear the timeless polka-dot without looking overly twee?

Luckily, this season designers filtered the graphic print through a fresh fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. lens waving a final goodbye to the days of Minnie Mouse-esque specks.

Instead, this modern take on dots successfully marries sophisticated style with a light-hearted edge.

The most playful of which appeared at Givenchy, where subtle circles came in the form of sliced geode prints and oversized agate pendants. But, they didn’t stop there.

The house continued to give the trend some serious graphic bite with contemporary pattern blocking, cosmic colouring and fly-away ruffles of chiffon.

For Comme des Garcons and Louis Vuitton however, the classic print was matched with monochromatic garb. The former displayed black-and-white dots over enormous, sculptural pieces in true Comme style while a collection rooted in Parisienne style saw Louis Vuitton add polka dotsPolka dots are most commonly seen on children’s clothing, toys, and furniture, but they appear in a wide array of contexts. The pattern rarely appears in formal contexts, however, and is generally confined to more playful attire such as bathing suits and lingerie. Occasionally, white-on-black small dots appear on more formal clothing. to 80s floaty dresses.

This season, the runways challenged our preconceptions of the retro motif for sure as it abandoned its syrupy roots in favour of refined fabrics and fluid silhouettes.

As such, polka-dots promise to add a playful element to your real-life wardrobeA wardrobe is a standing closet used for storing clothes.The earliest wardrobe was a chest, and it was not until some degree of luxury was attained in regal palaces and the castles of powerful nobles that separate accommodation was provided for the apparel of the great. The name of wardrobe was then given to a room in which the wall-space was filled with closets and lockers, the drawer being a comparatively modern invention. From these cupboards and lockers the modern wardrobe, with its hanging spaces, sliding shelves and drawers, evolved slowly. with a grown-up guise. Wear yours small and on a clean silhouette or go big or go home to really make an unapologetically bold statement.

source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/fashion-trend-spring-summer-2017-polka-dots-print-a7680691.html

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Clare Waight Keller Is Givenchy’s New Artistic Director

Today Givenchy announced Clare Waight Keller as the brand’s new artistic director, confirming months of industry speculation. Waight Keller will oversee all creative responsibilities at the house, including women’s and men’s ready-to-wear and accessoriesA fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearer’s outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearer’s look., as well as haute couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques.. The appointment is effective May 2.

“The teams join me in warmly welcoming Clare Waight Keller into the Givenchy family,” said Philippe Fortunato, CEO of Givenchy, in a statement. “I am very excited to see Clare bring her singular sense of elegance and modernity to Givenchy. By exploring our maison’s 65-year heritage and the outstanding savoir faire of its ateliers, I am convinced Clare will help Givenchy reach its full potential.”

Waight Keller replaces Riccardo Tisci, who left the LVMH-owned brandA brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer. after his combined Fall 2017 men’s and Spring 2017 haute couture show in January, reportedly for Versace, though that appointment has not been made official.

“I am very happy to have Clare Waight Keller join the LVMH Group,” Bernard Arnault, the chairman and CEO of LVMH, said in the same statement. “I believe her widespread expertise and vision will allow Givenchy to enter the next phase of its unique path.”

Formerly the creative director of Chloé, Waight Keller is to be the first woman to lead at Givenchy. Previous designers to hold the role include John Galliano, Alexander McQueen, and Julien Macdonald—all Brits, like Waight Keller herself. With 12 years at the house, Tisci, who is Italian, enjoyed the longest tenure after founder Hubert de Givenchy himself.

“Hubert de Givenchy’s confident style has always been an inspiration, and I am very grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this legendary house’s history,” said Waight Keller. “I look forward to working with the teams and writing a new chapter in this beautiful story.”

Waight Keller’s aesthetic is dissimilar from that of her direct predecessor—bohemian with a sporty side of tomboy, where Tisci’s was provocative and racy. But during her six years at Chloé, she built a vivid world through hit handbags, evocative advertising, a well-cast front row wearing the house’s latest offerings, and lively social feeds.

Her first collection for the brand, for Spring 2018, will be shown in Paris in October.

source: https://www.vogue.com/article/givenchy-designer-clare-waight-keller-artistic-director-announcement

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Clare Waight Keller Introduces Men’s Made-to-Measure at Her First Givenchy Couture Show

Clare Waight Keller showed her first couture collection for Givenchy today in Paris. The predominantly black-and-white lineup of slick flou and strict tailleur was a rethinking of Givenchy house codes with a contemporary after-dark feel. There was décolletage, optic dots, graphic stripes, and splashes of vibrant color (all probably destined for a red carpet very soon), but the biggest news was the introduction of men’s haute couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. garments.

This Spring 2018 haute couture menswear is a first for both Waight Keller and Givenchy. The range included just three looks total—each a slim-cut beaded jacket or vest worn with skinny trousers—but they left their mark. In the past, men’s made-to-measure and women’s couture businesses operated like church and state, with no crossover whatsoever. They have been so historically divided that the maisons associated with each craft are not just divided by gender, but by geography. Custom menswearIn clothing, a suit is a set of garments made from the same cloth, usually consisting of at least a jacket and trousers. Lounge suits (also known as business suits when sober in colour and style), which originated in Britain as country wear,are the most common style of Western suit. tailors have traditionally been located either in London’s Savile Row or in the Italian luxury hubs of Florence and Milan, while womenswear brandsA brand (or marque for car model) is a name, term, design, symbol or other feature that distinguishes one seller’s product from those of others.Brands are used in business, marketing, and advertising. Initially, livestock branding was adopted to differentiate one person’s cattle from another’s by means of a distinctive symbol burned into the animal’s skin with a hot branding iron. are part of France’s Chambre Syndicale. Until Givenchy’s joint effort today, Dolce & Gabbana was the only major brand to show both custom men’s and women’s collections, though even they divide their haute pieces by gender.

Shouldn’t more brands follow Givenchy’s lead? With the lines between what’s defined as menswear and womenswear blurring, and customers becoming more open about shopping across gender lines, it would make sense for men’s couture to be further integrated into a womenswear business. And let’s be honest, there’s definitely a market for elaborate menswear—check out Harry Styles’s and Timothée Chalamet’s suits for the proof.

source: https://www.vogue.com/article/givenchy-spring-2018-couture-menswear

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SPRING 2018 COUTURE-Givenchy

Clare Waight Keller’s collection showed the mettle of a woman. Grace and dignity have been lacking in the eveningwear arena recently. If anyone questioned why Givenchy would need to step forth again into haute couture, Waight Keller has silenced them.

“I wanted to use the strength of tailoring, but in a feminine way,” she said. Over the many formal evenings and red carpet events in Paris, London, New York, and Los Angeles that she had to face in her former career at Chloé, Waight Keller must have learned a thing or two about exactly how hard it is to get away with it without compromising a modern sense of womanhood. Sisters in the public eye—or anyone with the cash—who intend to stun all viewers without recourse to froufrou will take one look at the impeccable narrow coats and precise jackets the designer placed over glittering, complex gowns and recognize: That’s it!

Poised empathetically between self-protection and self-projection, Waight Keller’s solutions come as massive relief to grown women at a time when it feels like female power is being eroded. Oftentimes, designers admit they’re intimidated by the houses they step into. Waight Keller immersed herself in the Givenchy archive and came back with the portion of research she wanted: “The structure and graphism Hubert [de Givenchy] had in his work at the beginning.” And then, she said, she absorbed it and got on with working with the house teams in “the complete freedom couture offers.” She added, “One-third of the collection is in black.”

She denied that current politics had made her designsDesign is the creation of a plan or convention for the construction of an object or a system (as in architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit diagrams and sewing patterns).Design has different connotations in different fields (see design disciplines below). In some cases the direct construction of an object (as in pottery, engineering, management, cowboy coding and graphic design) is also considered to be design. so much of it. The sculpted, monastic necklines at the beginning of the show couldn’t have been fitted in ready-to-wear, she noted. But her black is nevertheless the color du jour, all over awards season, and it’s certain to attract many clients.

Waight Keller talked about being inspired by the idea of a garden at night. “The idea of the moonlight catching the dressA dress (also known as a frock or a gown) is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice (or a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment).,” she said. You saw that in the pieces that were gunmetal silver, hung with jet or crystal beads, and tiered—devices calculated to look great in movement. It wasn’t a completely perfect collection; she could have edited out the pink and multicolored rainbow dresses. But in this debut for Givenchy, Waight Keller distinguished herself as a woman who deserves to carve out her place in modern haute couture<span class="woD"Haute couture is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques..

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/spring-2018-couture/givenchy

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Audrey Hepburn’s Emotional Final Gift from Hubert de Givenchy

When Audrey Hepburn died on January 20, 1993, at the age of 63, she did so at her beloved home in the village of Tolochenaz, near Lausanne, Switzerland. Given three months to live after a diagnosis of appendix cancer, Hepburn asked to be taken from Los Angeles to her home in Switzerland, but getting there would be a risk to her health, People reported today. Until two friends, including longtime pal and fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. designer, Hubert de Givenchy, stepped in with a plan.

Hepburn’s longtime partner, Robert Wolders, told People that GivenchyGivenchy is a French luxury fashion and perfume house. It hosts the brand of haute couture clothing, accessories and Parfums Givenchy, perfumes and cosmetics. and Hepburn’s friend Rachel “Bunny” Lambert Mellon arranged for a private plane to carefully transport Hepburn from the U.S. to her 19th-century house in Switzerland.

“She was desperate to get back to Switzerland,” Wolders said. “She would probably have succumbed during the flight from L.A., so we went by private jet made possible by [designer and close friend] Hubert de Givenchy and her friend Bunny Mellon, and the pilots descended carefully to reduce the pressure slowly. She was basically on life support.”

Hepburn was able to spend Christmas in Switzerland, where, she told Wolders and her friends, she’d spent “the most beautiful Christmas [she’d] ever had.”

It’s fitting that Givenchy was able to give Hepburn this final giftA gift or a present is an item given to someone without the expectation of payment or return. An item is not a gift, if that item, itself, is already owned by the one to whom it is given.. The two were close friends for decades, with the kind of relationship that Givenchy, now 90, told The Telegraph in 2015 was a “kind of marriage.”

The pair got to know each other during the making of Hepburn’s 1954 film Sabrina, and became close while on the set of Funny Face, in 1957. Thus began a fashion love affair and friendship that spanned the better part of 40 years.

“Little by little, our friendship grew and with it a confidence in each other,” he said of Hepburn. “There [was never] any criticism of the other person, no upsets.”

To know Hepburn, it seems, was to know that she adored her town in Switzerland, which as USA Today noted in 2015, was her safe haven from the rest of the world.

“She never acted like a celebrity. She was very simple and friendly,” a neighbor told the publication. Hepburn is now buried in the Tolochenaz’s small cemetery near her home, which was also one of her final wishes.

source: https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2017/08/audrey-hepburn-emotional-final-gift-from-hubert-de-givenchy

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PRE-FALL 2018–Givenchy

The marble hall of the Palais de Justice is such an imposing venue—in vastness as well as symbolism—that Clare Waight Keller’s debut at Givenchy in early October was, to some extent, overwhelmed by both architecture and expectations. Simply by situating this pre-collection in a private home in Kent, south of London, the maison’s first female creative chief and native Brit has signaled a more personalized yet no less aspirational vision. She confirmed as much when we spoke by phone, since the Paris showroom visit did not sync with her weekly Channel commute. “There’s something about a domestic environment that feels relevant to me right now; it feels connected to the way we actually live and where we see ourselves,” said Waight Keller.

The intimate outdoor-indoor setting also accommodates two of the season’s key statements: covetable faux-furFake fur, also called fun fur or faux fur, is any material made of cellulose or synthetic fibers designed to resemble fur, normally as part of a piece of clothing. and enveloping shearling coatsA coat is a garment worn by both men and women,for warmth or fashion. Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these. Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods., plus versatile pleated skirts and dresses. Yes, regarding the former, she’s a convert, convinced that today’s light, luxe alternatives measure up, especially when boasting graphic herringbone or zigzag patterning and high-impact volume. “It feels much more modern to be looking away from the past in that aspect,” said Waight Keller. “There are newer ways to presenting old ideas.”

Apply this sentiment beyond fur and you arrive at the revival of the heritage 4G emblem, which existed long before broadband networks but has been relegated to Givenchy’s beauty packaging. Here, it’s been deployed boldly on sweaters and as subtler punctuation points. Get ready to see a lot more of it. But Waight Keller’s strongest mark on the house so far is how she is rethinking a familiar town-and-country mix. Everyday pieces have become color-blocked in hues as throwback as they are hyper-saturated (apparently, using red was a big deal for her). All those clean botanical and spotted prints are shared across the men’s and women’s collections (note the anthuriums, which The New York Times recently declared “an It flower”). Her emphasis on strong-shoulder tailoring, along with the presence of longer, fluid skirtsA skirt is a tube- or cone-shaped garment that hangs from the waist or hips and covers all or part of the legs. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer’s personal taste, which can be influenced by such factors as fashion and social context. and chic studded leather pants, all reference historic codes without stiffness. Meanwhile, her evening dresses, with their cascades of pleats and panels of velvet, are a deft departure from Riccardo Tisci’s adventures in transparency and tease at the couture to come.

As for the men’s offering, the designer said she’s aiming to establish a broader base, which for the moment seems like a commercial hedge. But the new GV3 bucket bag and pointed bicolor boots are destined to turn heads, just as the artisanal zodiac earrings prove a striking, individualized finishing touch (they were inspired by vintage cigarette cards). “You feel the strong character,” said Waight Keller, who is a Leo. Sure enough, that creative side is coming through.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/pre-fall-2018/givenchy

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Your First Look at Givenchy’s Pre-Fall 2018 Bags, Some of Designer Clare Waight Keller’s First for the Brand

For a designer who came from a handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items.-heavy brand (Chloé) and arrived at another handbag-heavy brandA brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer. (Givenchy), Clare Waight Keller seems determined to set the tone at her new position without relying too heavily on her accessories department. Her first collection was on the Spring 2018 runway, and it featured only a couple versions of a boxy little flap shoulder bag. Now that bag is back for a bit of a closer look in the brand’s just-released Pre-Fall 2018 lookbook, along with some other newcomers.

I’m an enormous fan of Waight Keller’s work, but that first little bag didn’t thrill me too much. I still think it lacks the inventive, modernist bohemian charm of the best bags created under her tenure at Chloé, like the Drew and Faye, but it’s clear she wanted to start her time presiding over Givenchy accessoriesA fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearer’s outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearer’s look. with something simple and not too bold. In this new collection, though, another new design has caught my eye: a hybrid bucket bag/hobo with chain detail, which strikes exactly the kind of casually elegant note that has long characterized Waight Keller’s best work.

The lookbook also includes some men’s bags, and you can check out the full run below.

source:https://www.purseblog.com/givenchy/givenchy-pre-fall-2018-bags/

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Introducing the Givenchy Infinity Bags

When I think of Givenchy, I think of bags carried in the crook of the arm, and for good reason—all of the brand’s most notable handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items. for the last several years have been structured that way. The Antigona, Nightingale, Pandora, Lucrezia, Obsedia, Shark, Horizon: all satchels or top handles, at least in their original forms. Now, though, trends have started to swing away from statement satchels and toward easy-to-carry shoulder bags and hobos, and Givenchy has decided to swing with them. The result of those efforts is the Givenchy Infinity Bags, which have just started becoming available to purchasePurchasing refers to a business or organization attempting to acquire goods or services to accomplish the goals of its enterprise. Though there are several organizations that attempt to set standards in the purchasing process, processes can vary greatly between organizations. Typically the word “purchasing” is not used interchangeably with the word “procurement”, since procurement typically includes expediting, supplier quality, and transportation and logistics (T&L) in addition to purchasing. or pre-order.

So far, the Infinity line consists of four bags: a hobo in two sizes, a drawstring-free bucket bag, a compact flap shoulder bag and a saddle bag. The bags are all very simple and so far only come in a handful of neutrals like black, burgundy and navy, but they all share the same primary detail: a thick, silver-toned Cuban link chain. The chain adorns the bags’ straps, gussets or closures, depending on the designsDesign is the creation of a plan or convention for the construction of an object or a system (as in architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit diagrams and sewing patterns).Design has different connotations in different fields (see design disciplines below). In some cases the direct construction of an object (as in pottery, engineering, management, cowboy coding and graphic design) is also considered to be design., and it provides both a unifying note for the collection and the perfect bit of functionality-preserving visual interest.

The bucket version of the Infinity, above, is my favorite bag from the brand in recent memory. The wide, comfortable-looking strap is just long enough that swinging it onto and off of your arm should be easy, and it looks like the perfect size to hold a ton without becoming a black hole. Check out it and the other Infinity bags, as well as their prices, below.

source:https://www.purseblog.com/givenchy/givenchy-infinity-bags/

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SPRING 2018 READY-TO-WEAR–Givenchy

To mark the changing of the guard at Givenchy, the LVMH-owned house secured the Palais de Justice, a magisterial building of mid-19th-century vintage on the ?le de la Cité, never before used for a fashion show. It’s Givenchy’s exclusively for the next three years and it’s dazzling. Clare Waight Keller, the British designer formerly in the creative director’s chair at Chloé, has inherited Givenchy from Riccardo Tisci, who left the label in February after 12 years. That’s an epoch by today’s they’re-in-and-then-they’re-out-again standards. While he was here, he transformed Givenchy into one of the red-hot labels of Paris fashion without so much as a nod in the direction of the archives. Which means that, in a season of debuts, this one was the most keenly anticipated.

In a preview, Waight Keller said she did indeed look back at house founder Hubert de Givenchy’s dynamic sketches, and that she came to the conclusion that he started everything with the shoulder; also, that he was a fan of graphic print. She said she chose two: a clover from 1961 and the animal motifs of 1981. Her color cues came from the archives as well: lots of black and white with pops of mint and red. Waight Keller met the 90-year-old couturier last week and left their hour-long meeting feeling like she had his blessing. He confirmed her impressions about his design aesthetics.

On the runway, that strong shoulder and the graphic patterns were much in evidence. She opened with a double-breasted brass-buttoned coatdress cinched with the season’s de rigueur fanny pack and followed it up with a breezy dress in three different sizes of clover print. Salable stuff, but not high fashion of the kind the industry has been trained to expect from Givenchy. Waight Keller, who had a lot of success with accessoriesA fashion accessory is an item used to contribute, in a secondary manner, to the wearer’s outfit, often used to complete an outfit and chosen to specifically complement the wearer’s look. at Chloé, introduced the GV3—a new multi-strap handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items. named after Givenchy’s original address on Paris’s Avenue Georges Cinq—and her V-point knee-high bootsA boot is a type of footwear and a specific type of shoe. Most boots mainly cover the foot and the ankle, while some also cover some part of the lower calf. Some boots extend up the leg, sometimes as far as the knee or even the hip. Most boots have a heel that is clearly distinguishable from the rest of the sole, even if the two are made of one piece. looked cool and were designed with a woman’s eye for comfort and practicality. Men’s will prove a steep learning curve; her opening salvo looked like Tisci by way of Hedi Slimane. The show ended with evening, which is more Waight Keller’s element. Any one of the little black dresses could end up on Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, or Julianne Moore, all of whom sat front row. Still, the whole remained less than the sum of its parts.

There is no right answer about how to approach a heritage brand in 2017. Do look at the archives or don’t. . . Acknowledge your predecessor or ignore him. . . What’s required are clothes with a heart and soul, something to get the blood pumping. Waight Keller has a big support system behind her at Givenchy and she’s done this before. Let’s give her some time.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/spring-2018-ready-to-wear/givenchy

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