A Brief History of Louis Vuitton’s Famous Monogram

Louis Vuitton announced the appointment of Virgil Abloh as its menswear artistic director today. As such, Abloh will become the latest designerA designer is a person who designs. More formally, a designer is an agent that “specifies the structural properties of a design object”.[1] In practice, anyone who creates tangible or intangible objects, products, processes, laws, games, graphics, services, and experiences is referred to as a designer. to reinterpret Vuitton’s 122-year-old logo.

Before Alboh there were Nicolas Ghesquière’s’s runway reworks, (Marc Jacobs’s before him), Takashi Murakami’s Pop-minded collaboration of 2003, Catherine Deneuve’s traveling trunks, and Dapper Dan’s knock-ups made in his boutique on East 125th Street in Harlem. But of course, how you know the monogram isn’t what matters—it’s that you know it. The interlocking L and V with floral pattern was designed by Louis Vuitton’s son, Georges Vuitton, in 1896 as a way to brand his nascent box and luggage businessA business, also known as an enterprise or a firm, is an organization involved in the trade of goods, services, or both to consumers., and in the 120 years since, it’s become one of the most recognizable marks in the world.

Within the fashion arena, the LV monogram is having something of a resurgence. Since Ghesquière was named artistic director in 2013, the designer has made a point of incorporating it into his collections in new and novel ways—see: the floral-shaped heels of his Spring 2015 boots. Celebrate the history of the iconic house with this look back at its logo in 15 bite-size notes.

Abloh’s predecessor Kim Jones has had his way with the logo, too, using it in a Supreme collaboration in 2017 and as his sign-off from the maison during his final Fall 2018 menswearIn clothing, a suit is a set of garments made from the same cloth, usually consisting of at least a jacket and trousers. Lounge suits (also known as business suits when sober in colour and style), which originated in Britain as country wear,are the most common style of Western suit. show.

Here, a look back at the storied history of Louis Vuitton’s LVs. Let’s see where Virgil takes them this June.

It was 1854 when Louis Vuitton established his luggage business in Paris at 4 Rue Neuve des Capucines. As rail and then automobile travel became an established part of life, Vuitton’s business began to grow. Carried by the likes of Paul Poiret, Dora Maar, and Francis Picabia, LV luggage was not only a status symbol but also a practical purchase: Its trunks were—and still are—waterproof to prevent accidental damage to the items inside. They first appeared in the LV monogram pattern in 1896.

source: https://www.vogue.com/article/louis-vuitton-monogram-bags-history

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RESORT 2019–Louis Vuitton

Last week Nicolas Ghesquière took to InstagramInstagram is a mobile, desktop, and Internet-based photo-sharing application and service that allows users to share pictures and videos either publicly, or privately to pre-approved followers. It was created by Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, and launched in October 2010 as a free mobile app exclusively for the iOS operating system. A version for Android devices was released two years later, in April 2012, followed by a feature-limited website interface in November 2012, and apps for Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 in April 2016 and October 2016 respectively. It is owned by Facebook. to announce that he had renewed his Louis Vuitton contract with the hashtag #notgoinganywhere. The news made headlines, which says something about the instability of the fashion industry in 2018. All is change, with designers coming and going ever quicker, the possible denouement of department stores as we knew them, and the public’s new taste for accumulating luxury experiences, not luxury goods. In the face of all that, Ghesquière’s staying put is something to feel optimistic about.

So was today’s Resort show, which was Ghesquière’s fifth for the house, and his freest so far. To look back at his first Resort show, held up the Cote d’Azur in Monaco from this evening’s location at the Fondation Maeght in St. Paul-de-Vence (the Cruise collections are all about #goingsomewhere), is to see how quickly he established his LV codes. The eclectic tailoring, the zesty color and unexpected embroideryEmbroidery is the craft of decorating fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn., the treatment of each item of clothing almost like a treasure, or an accessory, which is of course the house patrimony—they were all here and then some, but the accessories are a good place to start. Ghesquière collaborated with his friend, the stylist and former Vogue Creative Director Grace Coddington, on a collection of bags based on the sketches she does of her beloved cats and his dog. They’ll be the proverbial catnip to their many followers. This season’s over-the-knee boot/sneaker hybrids are likewise going be popular. An elaboration of the best-selling trainers of Spring ’18, they made the ladylike pumps of the more recent Fall collection look like an anomaly.

The clothes, too, had a cool factor that was vintage Ghesquière: a little bit cult-y, a lotta bit ’80s, with a soupçon of executive realness, and, for good measure, some beaded silk lingerieLingerie is a category of women’s clothing including at least undergarments, sleepwear and lightweight robes. The specific choice of the word often is motivated by an intention to imply the garments are alluring, fashionable or both. bits and hand-painted acid-washed denim (an obvious nod to the Maeght’s modern and contemporary art collection). There were celebrities to beat the band in attendance—Emma Stone, Sienna Miller, Jennifer Connelly, Ruth Negga, Laura Harrier—but this was not a collection for the red carpet with its stiff and stultifying rules. Ghesquière said he wanted to pay homage to eccentricity. “What is it today to be an original, [someone] who has her own way of dressing? This bricolage . . . you can start a real movement. I love those people who are eccentric.” He meant Coddington and her cohort, but with this collection he proved himself more than worthy of the appellation.

An aside about luxury experiences: In Ghesquière’s five years at Louis Vuitton, the French maison has gotten quite good at executing them. Of the 600 guests at today’s show, nearly half were clients. Seeing the mega-yacht anchored outside the Hotel du Cap after-party sparked an idea. Louis Vuitton cruises? Louis Vuitton boutique hotels? Surely there’s opportunity there.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/resort-2019/louis-vuitton

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How I Got My Louis Vuitton Neverfull At A Discount

Happy Hump Day homies!

Alright – let’s get into it: I want to introduce you guys to the mystical, magical, fairy tale world of pre-owned designerA designer is a person who designs. More formally, a designer is an agent that “specifies the structural properties of a design object”.[1] In practice, anyone who creates tangible or intangible objects, products, processes, laws, games, graphics, services, and experiences is referred to as a designer. bags, like the Louis Vuitton Neverfull bag I wear in these pics. And more specifically, I want to introduce you to Vestiaire Collective. Have you heard of them? If you haven’t, you can thank me later because I’m about to blow your mind. And if you have but haven’t ever purchased anything from them, I’m going to ease you to the edge of that cliff and tell you to confidently jump right off!

Vestiaire Collective is a site where you can buy pre-owned designer items. Everything from shoes to clothes to handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items. from designers like Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Celine, Prada, Chloe – all of them!

And I’ll be honest – I had a healthy amount of skepticism about buying from a site like this. How do I know if the bag is real? How do I know that it will arrive looking as good as it did in the picture online? How do I know it will ever arrive at all?

Well, I had the opportunity to team up with Vestiaire Collective to try out ordering from their site and see how the whole process works, and let me tell you guys: I am now a full-on BELIEVER!!

My experience could not have been more seamless. I got on there knowing that I wanted the Louis VuittonLouis Vuitton Malletier, commonly referred to as Louis Vuitton or shortened to LV, is a fashion house and luxury retail company founded in 1854 by Louis Vuitton. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods to ready-to-wear, shoes, watches, jewelry, accessories, sunglasses and books. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses; it sells its products through standalone boutiques, lease departments in high-end department stores, and through the e-commerce section of its website. Neverfull bag. This bag has been on my radar for a hot minute now. Although I’d never been a gal who obsessed over Louis Vuitton like some peeps do, I think I had just seen this Louis Vuitton Neverfull so many times it finally wore me down and I suddenly felt like I HAD to have it – know what I mean? For travel, for errand days when I need a large but still classy looking tote, for sweater season – for all those reasons I just suddenly needed this bag. Know how that happens guys?

K anywho – one of the things I loved about this site is how easy it was to search for exactly what I was looking for. You have the option of indicating what type of condition you want the item to be in (very good, good, or fair), which really narrows it down. There are several other filters to narrow down searches as well. I also liked that Vestiaire authenticates all designer items before the sale posts, so you don’t have to worry about buying a fake.

All of that goodness above is how I was able to find the exact Louis Vuitton Neverfull bag that I’d been hunting for: this ‘like new’, 2016 Louis Vuitton Neverfull! This baby is literally exactly what I had wanted – red interior, a super recent purchase that was ‘like new’ in the ‘Monogram’ print, size MM (that’s their medium size of this bag). I perused Vestiaire Collective and there she was. Bam baby!

The best part: the purchase price for this Louis Vuitton Neverfull ended up being over $400 less than what I would have paid retail. And it’s literally like new! Came with the original receipt, the duster bag, and everything I would have needed to verify that it’s legit.

Moral of this story: Check out Vestiaire Collective. If you’ve had your eye on a designer item, this would be a great way to finally get your hands on it. And it’s perfect timing because hello – HOLIDAY SEASON! Get that thang as a gift! AND, Vestiaire is running a promotion right now where you’ll get 10% off orders over $300 with code 10NOVEMBER. Woot! 🙂

Let me know if you have any questions about this peeps!

source: http://forthelove.blog/got-louis-vuitton-neverfull-discount/

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Alicia Vikander Kicks Off Her Global Tomb Raider Tour in Louis Vuitton

Alicia Vikander has been on a winning red carpet streak. Last week she attended a screening for Tomb Raider in Berlin wearing a stunning Louis VuittonLouis Vuitton Malletier, commonly referred to as Louis Vuitton or shortened to LV, is a fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers. house and luxury retail company founded in 1854 by Louis Vuitton. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods to ready-to-wear, shoes, watches, jewelry, accessories, sunglasses and books. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses; it sells its products through standalone boutiques, lease departments in high-end department stores, and through the e-commerce section of its website. off-the-shoulder dressA dress (also known as a frock or a gown) is a garment consisting of a skirt with an attached bodice (or a matching bodice giving the effect of a one-piece garment)., and for tonight’s premiere of the movie in London, the actress chose another show-stopping number from the French house.

The exaggerated shoulder treatment was a fashion-forward take on the classic ruffle. In fact the body-skimming floral look managed to toe the line between past and future overall. Geometric diamond jewelry punctuated Vikander’s look with a directional slant and sparkling finish.

WHO: Marion Cotillard
WHAT: Halpern
WHERE: At the Cesar Film Awards, Paris
WHEN: March 2, 2018

source:https://www.vogue.com/article/alicia-vikander-tomb-raider-london-premiere-custom-louis-vuitton-celebrity-red-carpet-style

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Gender equality takes centre stage for Louis Vuitton show

On the last night of a month of fashion weeks, Hollywood decamped to Paris for the Louis Vuitton catwalk show. Emma Stone arrived fresh from the Oscars along with fellow actors Sienna Miller, Michelle Williams and Jaden Smith.

The clothes were “quintessentially French”, said designer Nicolas Ghesquière after the show, which repurposed the sculpture galleries of the Louvre as a catwalk. “I looked back to the French women who surrounded me when I was growing up. The women who taught me to be the person I am today. There is a particularity to French women, and this is quite a strict collection, I think.”

This was a more traditional, ladylike show than is typical of Ghesquière, who in a stellar fashion career has pioneered an angular, futuristic aesthetic. (One of his all-time greatest hits were shoes inspired by Lego; spring’s Archlight, a bulky, jolie-laide “dad sneaker” is a new season sellout at £780.)

First on to the catwalk was a black suit with pencil skirt and matching cropped jacket, worn with an ivory blouse and black heels. As per old-school catwalk protocol, suits for daytime were followed by a “flou” section of soft dresses and separates, before the show ended with eveningwear.

Ghesquière said he focused on real women because of the cultural shift around gender equality. “It’s a dialogue we have every day,” he said. “This dialogue about women is really important when you work in fashion.” Asked why this was expressed in a demure and ladylike aesthetic he responded that “sometimes we think to empower a woman means putting trousers on her. The women I dress don’t dress for men and they don’t dress like men. They dress for themselves and like themselves”.

Catherine Deneuve, whose controversial views on the #MeToo movement have been noted, came backstage after the show to embrace Ghesquière.

So important was this show to Ghesquière that he was one of the few major French designers missing from a dinner hosted by the country’s president, Emanuel Macron, at the élysée for luminaries of Paris fashion on Monday night.

The dinner was a glamorous showpiece of Macron’s business-friendly messaging promoting France to international entrepreneurs. Thom Browne, the US designer who recently moved his show from New York to Paris, was seated at the top table. The British designers Sarah Burton and Stella McCartney were also at the dinner.

Ghesquière, despite his absence from dinner, has a well-placed ambassador at the court of Macron in the form of Brigitte Macron, a devotee of Louis Vuitton, who wore a cutaway brocade frock coat from the current collection to the dinner. (Anna Wintour wore Chanel.)

The neat, curve-hipped peplum jackets, corset-style belts and ultra slim trousersTrousers (pants in North America and Australia) are an item of clothing worn from the waist to the ankles, covering both legs separately (rather than with cloth extending across both legs as in robes, skirtsA skirt is a tube- or cone-shaped garment that hangs from the waist or hips and covers all or part of the legs. The hemline of skirts can vary from micro to floor-length and can vary according to cultural conceptions of modesty and aesthetics as well as the wearer’s personal taste, which can be influenced by such factors as fashion and social context., and dresses). In the UK the word “pants” generally means underwear and not trousers.Shorts are similar to trousers, but with legs that come down only to around the area of the knee, higher or lower depending on the style of the garment. To distinguish them from shorts, trousers may be called “long trousers” in certain contexts such as school uniform, where tailored shorts may be called “short trousers”, especially in the UK. at Vuitton’s Paris show made for a more body conscious collection than has been seen on most catwalks this month. But it reinforced several trends that look set to dominate next season: black leather skirts, and “western” styling, which made an appearance on high-waisted tight trousers and wing-collared shirtsA shirt is a cloth garment for the upper body (from the neck to the waist).Originally an undergarment worn exclusively by men, it has become, in American English, a catch-all term for a broad variety of upper-body garments and undergarments. In British English, a shirt is more specifically a garment with a collar, sleeves with cuffs, and a full vertical opening with buttons or snaps (North Americans would call that a “dress shirt”, a specific type of “collared shirt”). A shirt can also be worn with a necktie under the shirt collar..

source: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2018/mar/06/gender-equality-centre-stage-louis-vuitton-paris-fashion-week

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FALL 2018 MENSWEAR–Louis Vuitton

Applauded to the roof while flanked by Naomi Campbell and Kate Moss on his final circuit, Kim Jones made quite an exit from Louis Vuitton today. Jones has been artistic director for menswearIn clothing, a suit is a set of garments made from the same cloth, usually consisting of at least a jacket and trousers. Lounge suits (also known as business suits when sober in colour and style), which originated in Britain as country wear,are the most common style of Western suit. since 2011, building up its reputation with men and boys—majorly because of last year’s phenomenal Supreme collaboration, but also because he’s a really good designer who inspires loyalty. “It makes me very emotional,” he admitted in an interview in the manic end-of-era atmosphere in the Vuitton studio a day before the show. As soon as he’d posted the news of his leaving that morning on his Instagram feed, “there were, like, 800 comments immediately, and they were all super-positive, which you never know these days,” he said.

His departure after seven years is amicable and his choice, though he gave no clue as to where he is headed (Versace or Burberry being the much-speculated-over possibilities). “I thought this was a nice way to leave,” he said, indicating a honey beige cashmere LV monogrammed sweater emblazoned with Peace and Love, bound to sell out as a souvenir of his tenure.

Performing the feat of making a super-expensive brand seem accessibly aspirational to a mass audience has made Jones something of a cult figure among young men in the age of social media. Instagram itself was only just invented (in 2010) when he joined. Reflecting on what has happened since, he remarked, “It’s how things have changed. The speed of it. If you don’t evolve, you die.”

How did he evolve the label? Even without the afterglow of Supreme (and there was some blowback on the credibility of the worshipped skate brand for collaborating), Jones tweaked the ever-present travel heritage of Vuitton to make it sync with the experiential preferences of the much-vaunted millennial generation—their valuing of doing above owning. His final collection was all about that: getting outdoors, albeit shod in the most costly of hiking boots known to man, and, in one case, with a backpack consisting of a Louis VuittonLouis Vuitton Malletier, commonly referred to as Louis Vuitton or shortened to LV, is a fashion house and luxury retail company founded in 1854 by Louis Vuitton. The label’s LV monogram appears on most of its products, ranging from luxury trunks and leather goods to ready-to-wear, shoes, watches, jewelry, accessories, sunglasses and books. Louis Vuitton is one of the world’s leading international fashion houses; it sells its products through standalone boutiques, lease departments in high-end department stores, and through the e-commerce section of its website. suitcase equipped with a dangling camo fur blanket roll.

Jones, who is English, was born in Africa and has a genuinely voracious appetite for travel, nature, and animals, in addition to being an encyclopedic authority on street and underground fashion. The scratchy rock–textured prints in the collection were developed from his own aerial landscape photographs taken from a helicopter in Kenya last summer. His other source of inspiration came from watching a rodeo in Wyoming. “The flank men wear these sweat-shorts,” he said, “so we did them in cashmere. And I thought it would be a nice nod to the Western to embroider this leather jacketA jacket is a mid stomach length garment for the upper body. A jacket typically has sleeves, and fastens in the front or slightly on the side. A jacket is generally lighter, tighter-fitting, and less insulating than a coat, which is outerwear. Some jackets are fashionable, while others serve as protective clothing. with flowers, like they do cowboy boots.”

The genius extra twist came with the patchwork-printed monogrammed leggings. After all the wide, oversize fashion that’s been slopping around recently, they suddenly looked like a brainwave of a backlash. Jones’s quality geekiness was also fully on show. Coats with detachable linings, metallic threads, taped seams, and zippers, and that holy grail of luxury, the vicu?a coat—all these items and their super-advanced technicalities are exactly the kinds of details that appeal to the psychology of one-upmanship.

Those who will actually get their hands on them will be few. But as Kim Jones waves goodbye, there will be many who will be eager to follow where he’s going.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/fall-2018-menswear/louis-vuitton

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PRE-FALL 2018–Louis Vuitton

At Louis Vuitton, there are the mega-explosively directional runway shows in Paris, the destination-travel extravaganzas laid on for Resort, and then there’s the in-between season, Pre-Fall. Presented without much ado on appointment at LVMH HQ, this is where subtle filtrations from the last show are exhibited alongside continuity productsIn marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need. In retailing, products are called merchandise. In manufacturing, products are bought as raw materials and sold as finished goods. Commodities are usually raw materials such as metals and agricultural products, but a commodity can also be anything widely available in the open market., the nearest this storied brand gets to basics.

Nicolas Ghesquière fans with an eye for his merging of the worlds of sport with historical costume will pick up on the most salient echoes of the last season: the knitted sweaters with billowy silk poet sleeves and the “Curve” trainers. The last—now developed with integral socksA sock is an item of clothing worn on the feet and often covering the ankle and some part of the calf. Some type of shoe or boot is typically worn over socks. that hit ankle-length—were launched on the Spring runway; surely a Louis Vuitton bid for the marathon run which is the “ugly” sneakersSneaker (also known as athletic shoes, tennis shoes, gym shoes, runners, takkies, or trainers) are shoes primarily designed for sports or other forms of physical exercise, but which are now also often used for everyday wear. inter-brand competition du jour.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/pre-fall-2018/louis-vuitton

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FALL 2018 READY-TO-WEAR—Louis Vuitton

A spaceship landed in a disused courtyard of the Louvre tonight. The Cour Lefuel (aptly named, non?) was constructed in the 1850s for Napoleon III, complete with giant ramps for his horses. In the stakes for most sensational show setting, Louis Vuitton’s Nicolas Ghesquière beat himself at his own game. His models descended the 19th-century ramps flanked by large statues of wild boars, then looped around the edge of a platform like something out of Star Wars. Once the spaceship takes off again, the courtyard will close for three years of renovations.

Though the idea of time periods colliding was carried over from last season, this collection was less outré in its execution. Instead of Louis XV frock coatsA coat is a garment worn by both men and women,for warmth or fashionFashion is a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion is a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style in which a person dresses. It is the prevailing styles in behaviour and the newest creations of textile designers.. Coats typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these. Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods. and pneumatic running shoes, we saw skirtsuits and other accoutrements of the haute bourgeois leavened with details like shoulder-spanning stripes and an LV logo that could possibly have been lifted from spaceship uniforms, given the setup.

Space has been a recurring motif throughout Ghesquière’s career; it’s animated some of his most imaginative, exciting work—remember the articulated C-3PO leggings? Here, he was operating in a much more grounded manner, though of course, this being Vuitton, the results were far from pedestrian. Metal chains and doodads elaborately trimmed cropped jackets; dense beadwork decorated the oddly asymmetrically draped halter tops for evening. Ghesquière must’ve liked the off-ness of that gesture. The models wore only one glove on their bag hand. Flat envelope handbagsA handbag, also called purse or pouch in North American English, is a handled medium-to-large bag, often used by women, to carry personal items. and large totes printed with what looked like computer motherboard circuitry were the new developments on that front.

Hybrids and mash-ups have been a major theme this week. What distinguished Ghesquière’s was their almost mathematical precision, despite the intentional imbalance elsewhere in the collection. Fluid, snap-front shirtdresses, for example, were spliced above the shoulders with that striped spaceship uniform. The high-tech wizardry notwithstanding, the lasting impression was this collection’s chic wearability. Last night, at an Elysée Palace dinner hosted by her husband, Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron, Brigitte Macron wore one of Ghesquière’s Spring ’18 frock coats. There was plenty here for the fashion-loving, jacket-wearing French First Lady to like. It felt like a fitting way to end a season that has been much about representations of women, and how designers should dress us now.

source: https://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/fall-2018-ready-to-wear/louis-vuitton

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10 of Kim Jones’s Most Memorable Moments at Louis Vuitton

Kim Jones is addicted to travel. His departure from Louis Vuitton to pastures new was always going to happen. His professional destination—the subject of much rumor—remains a secret for now, but it’s not quite wheels up yet. Jones will present his 14th and final show for the house tomorrow in what will be a celebratory farewell. Before he goes, here are five of our favorite looks from key show stopovers during Jones’s stint as Louis Vuitton’s menswear pilot, alongside five of his most newsworthy moments.

The Look: Spring 2012, Exit 20

Jones’s June 2011 debut demonstrated that this was a designer who could a) deliver gently casualized tailoring and outerwear that would kick ass in an haute executive/millionaire-of-taste context, b) articulate it in a manner that stood convincingly alongside the extraordinary shows being produced by Marc Jacobs and his team in the Louis Vuitton womenswear studio, and c) make it personal but not ego-trippy. The insertion of Masai shuka checks was a nod to his own upbringing in Kenya and hint at the peripatetic Jones formula to come. —Luke Leitch

From Jones’s debut in Spring 2012 all the way through to his Spring 2018 collection, he’s remained staunchly committed to a piece of adornment around his models’ necks, whether it’s a red band or a silver chain. This trend might not have caught on with the general male population, but you have to commend the consistency. —Steff Yotka

The Look: Fall 2012, Exit 23

Check this sophomore riff from Jones and you’ll see that he was doing luxury athleisure way before it became a thing (Look 14). Plus, he wasn’t afraid of a big logo way before a big logo became a faux-postmodern fashion gesture (Look 20). However, it was the kimono jackets worn as a mid-layer, produced by a Japanese silk specialist capable of producing only 20 centimeters of fabric a day, that were the purest thematic expression of this Paris-meets-Tokyo (to a Giorgio Moroder soundtrack) collection. —L.L.

The Look: Fall 2013, Exit 37

This Bhutanese-facing collection gave Jones extra reason to express his excellence as a designer of luxury technicalwear and featured shirt studs made of stone from Mt. Everest. It also inaugurated his contribution to a Louis Vuitton habit for collaboration that began when Jacobs worked with Stephen Sprouse. Jake and Dinos Chapman’s cute snow leopards (and a more typically terrifying menagerie of animals) were incorporated into silk eveningwear and carpet bags, elevating a collection dedicated to attitude and altitude. —L.L.

The Moment: Judy Blame Makes Men’s Accessories a Must

It’s hard to convince guys to buy a brooch. But if anyone could make it happen, it’s Judy Blame. For a Fall 2015 collection inspired by the work of Christopher Nemeth, Jones asked Nemeth collaborator Blame to design pins, necklaces, and brooches to go along with his innovative collection. The safety pin–inspired pieces were deeply coveted by men and women alike—and still are to this day. —S.Y.

The Look: Spring 2016, Exit 1

“Volez, Voguez, Voyagez”—fly, sail, travel—was the drawn-from-the-archive Louis Vuitton imperative at a Jones collection that comprehensively revived the souvenir jacket and explored the adoration, integration, and, let’s face it, elevation of American workwear in postwar Japan. This was one of Jones’s first collections without a specific destination in mind: The journey was the thing. —L.L.

The Moment: Zayn Shows Up at the Spring 2016 Show

Even those of us blissfully in the dark about the allure of One Direction knew that the appearance of the man who broke up the band in the front row was a big deal. It was just after the group disbanded, and Zayn Malik’s Louis Vuitton star turn was at once juicy tabloid fodder and the beginning of the musician’s love affair with fashion. —S.Y.

The Look: Fall 2017, Exit 24

Yes, this was the Louis Vuitton x Supreme collaboration collection, a Jones-brokered masterstroke of brand dating that created a hyper-wave of hype like no other and was absolutely the headline of this show. The only shame was that the collaboration stole some of the spotlight from Jones’s all–Louis Vuitton work: The introduction of a carefully oversize silhouette to his Paris canon and a series of blinding outwearoutwear is a garment worn by both men and women,for warmth or fashion. Outwear typically have long sleeves and are open down the front, closing by means of buttons, zippers, hook-and-loop fasteners, toggles, a belt, or a combination of some of these. Other possible features include collars, shoulder straps and hoods. pieces made this—along with his debut—my personal joint Jones Louis Vuitton favorite. —L.L.

The Moment: Supreme x Louis Vuitton Breaks the Internet

Luke is right in calling the Fall 2017 Supreme x Louis Vuitton collaboration a “hyper-wave of hype.” Despite all the other subtle, sensible, disruptive things Jones did at Louis Vuitton, making nice with the brand’s onetime enemy and creating a collection that left hypebeasts out of their minds will forever be the top story in Jones’s Louis Vuitton oeuvre. —S.Y.

The Moment: Drake Writes a Song for Spring 2018

Jones soundtracked this Hawaiian-inspired collection with a custom track, “Signs,” by Drake. Sure, musicians make songs for brandsA brand is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes an organization or product from its rivals in the eyes of the customer. all the time, but what stood out about this collaboration was that Drake was reportedly inspired by Jones’s work at Louis Vuitton, turning his love of travel and high-low mix of menswearIn clothing, a suit is a set of garments made from the same cloth, usually consisting of at least a jacket and trousers. Lounge suits (also known as business suits when sober in colour and style), which originated in Britain as country wear,are the most common style of Western suit. into a track that promoted the house codes. That respect is something money can’t buy—and it reflects how beloved Jones is in the menswear market. —S.Y.

source: https://www.vogue.com/article/kim-jones-louis-vuitton-best-looks

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